Reasons Korea and I were meant to be… Part 2

1. I only believe in well behaved obedient children. Those are the only kind that seem to exist in Korea. They call you teacher, bow to greet, and never speak back to you. The fact that they’re also ridiculously adorable never hurts either.

2. 24 hours everything. Moving from Toronto to London was painful. I mean don’t get me wrong, I fell in love with London. But that’s another story for another day. The ONE thing that upset me about the city, though, is that nothing is open past 8. Oxford st shuts down at 8. How random is that!? It’s like oh hey we’re gonna tease you be all cool and stay open past 6 but not 9. Oh no. That would be ridiculous!

And if you wanted food in the middle of the night, you had to go to tinseltown. Again, LOVE the place but it’s not everyday that you want a thick chocolate-y milkshake. Wait. Did I just say that. All this kimchi must be getting to my head. But the point is, Korea is my seoulsister when it comes to this. (clever word play, no? I’m going to pretend I made that up and take credit for it.)

24 hours is how life should be lived. And sleep is so overrated. Especially when you get this sudden urge to clean at 3am and you’re out of cleaning supplies.

3. They pick up garbage everyday. No waiting for your weekly neighbourhood garbage pick up day while upping the funk smell factor in your garage. How AWESOME is that!?

4. In Korea, I’m a millionaire. Sure, a bottle of water costs 1250 won. But my bank account? In the millions, baby.

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7 Comments to “Reasons Korea and I were meant to be… Part 2”

  1. So all your kids are well behaved eh? You must have pulled the nice job from the hat cause all my friends tend to tell me their little kids can be monsters. Sure they bow and call you teacher…but they also stand on desks and kick other kids in the head lol. I have another friend who likes to blog about korea if you ever get bored and want something to read go here:http://kimchimaiden.wordpress.com/. Hope you had a good weekend.

    • Haven’t experienced the standing on desks or kicking *yet* although I should probably say I’ve only been here for 2 weeks so far. They seem too angelic to ever do something like that… but I may be speaking too soon :)

      I read your friend’s most recent entry… love her writing. Thanks for the recommendation!

  2. Tia, my kids can be monsters….they were angels for the first month or so, then they change. Korean kids can be just as rude, obnoxious and ill-mannered as western kids, plus they’ll talk crap about you in a language you can’t understand when you’re standing right there.

    I know what you mean about the 24 hours thing though….as a Brit who has lived in Korea for over 2 years, I can’t get used to things closing at 8 or 9 whenever I go back home! I love how the kimbap shops are open late, 24 hours a day, every single day!

    • Really!? So you think it’s going to change… I guess this means I have a month to enjoy the angelic behaviour.

      Yup, I have a family mart across the street and it’s 24 hours… so are a few of the restaurants down the street. I LOVE IT :)

  3. Obedience is a gift and a curse. Kids have to learn to challenge. I’m sure it makes your job easier but, because you’re a gifted educator, you don’t want to turn out automatons or industry fodder. Folk who obey orders go to war.

    • haha I completely agree! Things have changed quite a bit since I wrote this post. They’re still very obedient compared to the kids I’ve encountered back home in Canada/the west in general, but they’re also quick to talk back/question things when they disagree or think something is unfair. I’ve encouraged that a lot. Disagreeing with and/or questioning your elders in Korea is frowned upon and seen as disrespectful but I let them know it’s ok- even if it is just in my class.

      • I had big problems in Singapore until I got the hang of it. All of my staff said yes to me, even when the correct answer was no. Very confusing for a while!

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